OUR MODEL

1-Province 2-Kabul

Each PROVINCIAL OFFICE has a Senior Program Officer, a Program Assistant and a Quality Control Engineer to staff the office. Each play a critical role in running the operations.

If in a province, your organization is interested in monitoring for example, 50 projects in different communities, you will need to mobilize 50 communities to nominate 2 local monitors each. But it is hard for just 3 people to manage 100 local monitors. So, for every 20 local monitors, we recommend you hire a FOCAL POINT who will support the monitors and report back to you.

Here is how the math works out:3-Math
The HEAD OFFICE in Kabul chooses the provinces, sets up the office, hires the key personnel, and sets the number of projects to be monitored in each area.

The role of the HEAD OFFICE is to support the work of the PROVINCIAL OFFICES by providing the needed funding, resources and guidance when problems cannot be solved at the local level.

PROGRAM MANAGER

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The Program Manager is based at the HEAD OFFICE and in charge of the entire community-based monitoring program across all provinces of Afghanistan. Their duties include financial administration, reporting, personnel management and visiting each provincial office once-a-month to oversee the project monitoring, financial management and deal with administrative issues.

During project visits, program managers sit and discuss the issues in the projects with the local monitors. They should check in with them and ask whether they are getting the support they need. They should also ask about the behavior, work and performance of focal points and quality control engineers. Based on what they hear from local monitors, the program manager should instruct her/his staff to respond to the comments or concerns.

ENGINEER

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WHO ARE QUALITY CONTROL (QC) ENGINEERS
Quality Control Engineers are based in PROVINCIAL OFFICES and provide technical training and support to local monitors and the communities where CBM works. QC engineers are not just ordinary engineers. They are engineers who are committed to empowering communities by spreading their technical knowledge to ordinary people. They are not technocrats, who believe that they are the only ones capable to understand engineering concepts. Rather, they have faith in the ability of all citizens to learn how to understand construction material quality and technical issues.

PRIMARY ROLE OF ENGINEERS
Their primary role is teaching the community so that they can advocate for better quality infrastructure with technical experts with the contractor or government agency. QC engineers SHOULD NOT present themselves as the real monitors. The success of a QC engineer can be measured by how well the local monitors understand technical concepts and can monitor projects independently.

The quality control engineer should also be able to assess both structural and electric issues. They should also be able to use the testing laboratory. They will be conducting regular fieldwork, as well as write reports from the office and attend official Provincial Monitoring Board (PMB) or Local Monitors’ meetings.

PROJECT VISITS & QUALITY CONTROL EVALUATIONS
Though QC Engineers are not primarily responsible for technical monitoring for each project, they should visit the project 1 time in a month. During this visit, they should make sure that the local monitors have conducted a Quality Control Evaluation and take photographs/videos to document project progress and problems. They should also teach each local monitor how to properly do the Quality Control Evaluation.

PROVINCIAL MONITORING BOARD (PMB) MEETINGS & FIELD TRIPS
QC Engineers should be present at the Provincial Monitoring Board meetings to present the state of all projects monitored in the province. QC Engineers should take PMB members on field visits to various projects for one or two days each month. During the field trips, the QC Engineer will explain positive and negative attributes in the projects.

SENIOR ENGINEER

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The Senior Quality Control Engineer (QCE) is based in the HEAD OFFICE. Their duties include supporting all provincial QCE, hiring engineers, designing and updating training manuals and visiting the provincial offices once-a-month. The Senior QCE is responsible for solving problems when they cannot be solved by local authorities and require attention from national ministries or Kabul-based individuals.

They make sure that each of the Provincial engineers are doing their jobs well, get the regular training they require and are training the local monitors well. They should regularly meet with local monitors to check whether their technical training and knowledge of materials, material tests and quality issues is sufficient. If needed, they will organize extra trainings and provide new materials to support the local monitors.

SENIOR PROGRAM OFFICER

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WHO ARE SENIOR PROGRAM OFFICERS
They are based in the PROVINCIAL OFFICE and are in charge of all the charge of the entire community-based monitoring program in their province. Their duties inlcude financial administration, reporting, personnel management and visiting projects once-a-month to oversee the project monitoring.

PRIMARY ROLE OF SENIOR PROGRAM OFFICERS
Their primary role is to facilitate between the community’s monitoring efforts and the provincial government authorities, local civil society and construction contractors. They do a lot of relationship building with the provincial governor’s office, provincial council members, local departments of economy, health, public works, education, women’s affairs and rural rehabiitation & development.

They help set up the PMB, where all the individuals mentioned above meet once a month to discuss the projects being monitored across the province. They also regularly meet with communities (generally the local shura, CDC shura, etc.) to explain community monitoring and convince them to participate.

PROGRAM ASSISTANT

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WHO ARE PROGRAM ASSISTANTS?
The Program Assistant is based in the PROVINCIAL OFFICES and helps the Senior Program Officer in managing the community-based monitoring program. This includes assisting in financial, administrative and program reports. It also includes ensuring that monitoring data collected from local monitors and focal points is sent to the HEAD OFFICE for collection.

The Program Assistant helps in all logistical aspects of the operations and does what is required.

DATABASE OFFICER

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The Database Officer is based at the HEAD OFFICE and in charge of regularly maintaining the central monitoring database. This database has all of the weekly reports from local monitors regarding the progress and quality of each project. This database is available both offline for internal use and online for public use.

The Database Officer must regularly collect all the data from the provinces and input it into the central database. They also manage the data of local monitors, production of ID cards and assisting the Program Manager in their tasks.

FOCAL POINT

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WHO ARE FOCAL POINTS
Focal points are paid community workers who support local monitoring volunteers. If the local monitors cannot address the projects in the problems at the local level, focal points are supposed to be the first ones to hear their concerns and help facilitate a local solution.

In the past, focal points have come from a wide variety of ages, professions and ideologies. Some are former local monitors.


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ROLE AS MEDIATOR
Focal Points are mediators between IWA’s CBM program staff and the local communities, construction companies and district authorities. They should regularly communicate community concerns as identified by Local Monitors to the Provincial Office.
They are also the Local Monitor’s first phone call in case of an emergency, conflict or any other situation. They should be extremely careful in making sure that the communities are engaged in a constructive dialogue regarding the projects and do not shift in a conflict.

PROJECT VISIT & PHOTOGRAPHY
Focal Points are supposed to meet with each pair of Local Monitors once a week and visit the site to take photographs of the project. They should handover all project and meeting photos to the Program Officer on a weekly basis.

REPORTING
Focal Points are responsible for collecting the weekly report from Local Monitors or helping them write it when necessary. They are also responsible for filling out the focal point monitoring packet for each project with photographs stored separately in a database. All these materials should be given to the Program Officer.

TRAINING WORKSHOP AND BUILDING CAPACITY
Focal Points should participate in and help facilitate the training workshop when necessary. They should train the local monitors on the job. They should also identify the local monitors that will need a refresher course in either social or technical issues, or those that are not able to perform their job.

LOCAL MONITORS

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Two Local Monitors are responsible for monitoring 1 project. They are elected by their local communities during a community meeting. Electing the right monitors is key to the success of any community-based monitoring program.

They should have a certain set of characteristics, be committed to improving their communities and have the time to volunteer.

It is important to encourage the community to consider a wide range of candidates, including youth, women and ethnic minorities that may not be otherwise represented in the local shuras (village councils).

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