Provincial Monitoring Board

Provincial Monitoring Board Members Conducting a Field Visit of Regional Hospital, Herat City, Herat April 24 2012 | Photo by Huma Gupta

Provincial Monitoring Board Members Conducting a Field Visit of Regional Hospital, Herat City, Herat
April 24 2012 | Photo by Huma Gupta

WHAT IS IT

The Provincial Monitoring Board (PMB) Meeting is an important forum for various sectoral department representatives, civil society groups, project implementers, donors and community members to discuss ongoing projects in the province, in an attempt to resolve any and all issues with the projects. This meeting is held once a month in every province where CBM operates. For more information, see Chapter 3 case study on PMB.

This monthly forum is an opportunity to discuss ongoing infrastructure projects and problems related to them in a regular manner. As you can read in the case study, with government support and enthusiasm, the PMB can become a sustainable venture that does not always require a civil society organization to facilitate.

Download Sample PMB Charter in English

Download Sample PMB Report in Dari from Injil, Herat

WHO SHOULD CONDUCT IT

The PMB meeting is generally conducted by Integrity Watch staff, as we act as facilitators between community members and government officials. Our Senior Program Officer (PO) facilitates this meeting with the Quality Control Engineer (QC) and if needed, Focal Points (FP) or Local Monitors (LM) can be present to add more depth to the projects.

MATERIALS NEEDED FOR THE MEETING
You will need a laptop, projector, projector screen, lunch for attendants, beverages for attendants and a presentation jointly-prepared by the Provincial Quality Control Engineer and Program Officer that outlines the progress of and concerns with projects being monitored. All PMB members and attendees should receive a printout of the PowerPoint presentation.

Provincial Monitoring Board Meeting, Jabal Saraj, Parwan November 2011 | Photo courtesy of Anis Wazirgul

Provincial Monitoring Board Meeting, Jabal Saraj, Parwan
November 2011 | Photo courtesy of Anis Wazirgul

SAMPLE AGENDA

The meeting should last roughly 3 hours. The agenda should include:

1)  Welcome & Introductions.

2)  The Integrity Watch facilitator present should review the agenda and ask if modifications are needed.

3)  Presentation by the Quality Control Engineer reviewing projects with photographs and detailed notes.

4)  Case-by-case assessment and discussion on any projects that are facing problems and on the project that are evolving correctly or in the right direction. Negative and positive points should be brought up.

5)  Break for Lunch.

6)  Visit to project sites with PMB members. PMB field visits can happen either after the PMB meeting or on a separate day.

7)  Hand over presentation materials and PMB meeting notes to Project Manager (PM).

Download Sample PMB Presentation by Integrity Watch Engineer Here

PROBLEM SOLVING

In the experience of Integrity Watch, the PMB has proven to be an effective venue for solving problems as long as there is close cooperation with the provincial government. Since the Head of the Economy Department leads the meeting, his cooperation is key to the functioning of the board. Support from the Provincial Governor’s office also adds to the legitimacy of the PMB.

In the provinces where we have struggled to gain support from the economy department, the provincial monitoring board as an institution has not been able to gain legitimacy. Without government support, it is difficult to hold the PMB meeting regularly. And even when it is held, all of those invited may not attend.

Furthermore, PMB meetings can be a site of CONFLICT, because they raise sensitive issues as Integrity Watch employees are presenting problems in ongoing projects. Since both the implementer and the government department-who is responsible for monitoring-is partially to blame for quality issues, officials can be quite defensive during the meeting. In extreme circumstances, officials could even attack the work of the organization, trying to delegitimize the monitoring data and the entire community-based monitoring program.

 


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