Our Experiences

Local Monitors Rahmatullah & Abdul Salam in Gurghan, Mazar-e-Sharif November 14 2011 | Photos by Huma Gupta

Local Monitors Rahmatullah & Abdul Salam in Gurghan, Mazar-e-Sharif
November 14 2011 | Photos by Huma Gupta

The third chapter of the toolkit will introduce you to stories of community-based monitoring from four Afghan provinces. The reason that communities have to be involved in monitoring their own development projects is because there is a large gap in oversight of these projects, especially during times of insecurity and in remote locations. In some ways, communities have an advantage over donors, government officials and construction company engineers when it comes to monitoring. This is because they live close to the project, and do not have the same security and time constraints for regularly visiting the projects.

In other ways, communities can be disadvantaged during the monitoring process. This has to do with their lack of access to project documents, the lack of cooperation from government and construction company officials and an inability to directly communicate their concerns to donors and decision makers. But in addition to these general challenges, in order to have a good community-based monitoring program, you need to be self-critical and periodically reflect on the program’s evolution.

We have thus, organized our 8 case studies into three broad themes: Success, The Big Picture & Challenges.

  1. 2+2=4 Accountability & the Accounting Institute of Jalalabad
  2. Preaching Monitoring to the Masses
  3. “Sustainable” is not Always Jargon: The Curious Case of the Herat Provincial Monitoring Board
  4. Elite Capture
  5. Female Local Monitors & Citizenship in Afghanistan
  6. The Money Just Washes Away: Building Roads in Rural Afghanistan
  7. Roadblocks & Dead Ends on Charahi-Haji Ayub Road
  8. Tragedies of Corruption


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